A Leadership Case Study: Jessica Jackley and the Kiva Story

Kiva Kiva gives small loans to men and women in third world countries so they can begin their own microenterprises.  They are given a small amount of money, and pay back their loans from the money they make in their business’

Jesus said, “What you do for the least of these, you have done it unto me.”

The poorest of the poor have no resources to use as collateral for getting loans from banks.

A small infusion of collateral into these lives has an enormous return.

Anyone with a credit card and an internet connection can browse the profiles of entrepreneurs from third world countries, and lend them $25 or more.

This amount of money changes the lives of these people.

The re-payment from the entrepreneurs is 98.5%

AMAZING!

And this money changes their lives, lifting these people out of poverty.

2 thoughts on “A Leadership Case Study: Jessica Jackley and the Kiva Story

  • August 6, 2009 at 9:55 pm
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    Kiva has higher overhead costs (in time and money) than other micro lenders. But the benefit of that, more cross cultural connection, a face and a name and a goal makes the giving more real. Kiva is a worthwhile part of solution. If you find a Kiva where I can finance schooling for poor youths (16 to 35) while they learn marketable skills tell me, they are are a forgotten people group. Then also, what about widows, a Compassion international for widows is another value.

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  • February 9, 2010 at 7:33 pm
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    We met with Jessica Jackley when she came to Washington University in St. Louis in 2009. We too wish to be part of the effort to bridge blaring global inequalities rendering youth just like us without access to basic necessities. We are WashU undergraduate students working with youth (16-24) in Uganda who are making environmentally-friendly paper bead jewelry and the empowerment wages they earn (at least three times the Fair Trade standard) go toward their school fees. If you are intersted in buying jewelry from the youth or learning more, please visit http://www.CraftsByYouth.org. Thanks for this blog and comment!

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